SAfety Policies

Report the Violence

Understanding the Clery and Campus SaVE Act

Jeanne Clery was raped and murdered in her residence hall April 5th, 1986 and in 1991 Congress passed the CLERY ACT.  This federal statute requires colleges and universities participating in federal financial aid programs to maintain and disclose campus crime and fire statistics along with security information through a published  annual safety report.

On March 7th, 2013, the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (VAWA) (Pub. Law 113-4) was signed into law. The Campus Sexual Violence Elimination (SaVE) Act, part of the Violence Against Women Act Reauthorization, amended the Clery Act.

  • The SaVE Act addresses campus sexual violence policies.
  • The SaVE Act increases transparency on the campus of colleges and universities relating to sexual violence, sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and Stalking.
  • The SaVE Act guarantees victim’s enhanced rights, improves the reporting and support process, sets standards of disciplinary proceedings, and requires education programs.

 

Who’s Responsible To Report?

Officials with significant responsibility for student and campus activities

  • Vice Presidents of Student Life, Admissions, Marketing, Advancement, and Dean of Academic Affairs
  • Directors of Residence Life, Campus Safety, Facilities and Grounds
  • Athletic Director, Coaches, and Athletics’ staff
  • Faculty and Staff
  • Advisors to Students
  • R/A’s and Campus Safety employees

Contact The Department of Campus Safety for assistance when any act of violence is reported.

Domestic Violence

Understanding Arizona Domestic Violence

Under Arizona Law (ARS 13-3601), domestic violence is any of the following crimes:

  • Dangerous Crimes Against Children (13-604.01)
  • Endangerment (13-1201)
  • Threatening and Intimidating (13-1202)
  • Assault (13-1203)
  • Aggravated Assault (13-1204)
  • Custodial Interference (13-1302)
  • Unlawful Imprisonment (13-1303)
  • Kidnapping (13-1304)
  • Criminal Trespass (13-1502-1504)
  • Criminal Damage (13-1602)
  • Disorderly Conduct (13-2904)
  • Telephone Harassment (13-2916)
  • Stalking (13-2923)
  • Sexual Assault (13-1406 and 13-1425)
  • Abuse of a Child or Vulnerable Adult (13-3623)

 

When Is It Domestic Violence?

When the crime is committed against:

  • Spouse or former spouse
  • Persons residing or having resided in the same household (Roommates)
  • Persons having a child in common
  • A party who is pregnant by the other party
  • Parent, grandparent, grandson, stepchild, brother, or sister
  • A child who resides or has resided in the same household

When a police officer believes an act of domestic violence has occurred they are required by law to arrest the aggressor when an injury occurs, or when a weapon is used or threatened to be used.  They may make an arrest when any act of domestic violence occurs even when the other party does not want to prosecute.

 

Sexual Violence

Understanding Sexual Violence Under Arizona Law

  • Arizona law no longer uses the term “rape,” replacing it with sexual abuse or sexual assault to describe prohibited acts. Traditional rape is covered by these statutes. However, most sexual assault statutes cover more types of sexual acts than what is traditionally thought of as “rape” and apply to victims of either gender.
    • A.R.S. 13-1406-A person commits sexual assault by intentionally or knowingly engaging in sexual intercourse or oral sexual contact with any person without consent of such person
  • A mistake about age is not typically a defense to statutory rape charges, even if the underage person lied and gave consent. It is a “strict liability” offense, which makes the perpetrator responsible regardless of the surrounding circumstances.
  • Sexual abuse is when a person intentionally or knowingly engaging in sexual contact with any person who is fifteen or more years of age without consent of that person or with any person who is under fifteen years of age if the sexual contact involves only the female breast
    • “Sexual contact” means any direct or indirect touching, fondling or manipulating of any part of the genitals, anus or female breast by any part of the body or by any object or causing a person to engage in such contact.

 

When Is Sex Consensual?

Arizona Law defines “Without consent” includes any of the following:

(a) The victim is coerced by the immediate use or threatened use of force against a person or property.

(b) The victim is incapable of consent by reason of mental disorder, mental defect, drugs, alcohol, sleep or any other similar impairment of cognition and such condition is known or should have reasonably been known to the defendant. For purposes of this subdivision, “mental defect” means the victim is unable to comprehend the distinctively sexual nature of the conduct or is incapable of understanding or exercising the right to refuse to engage in the conduct with another.

(c) The victim is intentionally deceived as to the nature of the act.

(d) The victim is intentionally deceived to erroneously believe that the person is the victim’s spouse.

Date Violence

Understanding Dating Violence Under Arizona Law

ARS 13-3601 Defines the relationship between the victim and the defendant is currently or was previously a romantic or sexual relationship.

The following factors may be considered in determining whether the relationship between the victim and the defendant is currently or was previously a romantic or sexual relationship:

(a) The type of relationship.

(b) The length of the relationship.

(c) The frequency of the interaction between the victim and the defendant.

(d) If the relationship has terminated, the length of time since the termination.

 

Can I Get Arrested For Dating Violence?

  • Dating Violence refers back to the Domestic Violence laws in Arizona.

When a police officer believes an act of domestic violence has occurred they are required by law to arrest the aggressor when an injury occurs, or when a weapon is used or threatened to be used.  They may make an arrest when any act of domestic violence occurs even when the other party does not want to prosecute.

 

Stalking

Understanding Stalking Under Arizona Law

Stalking (ARS 13-2923) Defines Stalking as a person who intentionally or knowingly engages in a course of conduct that is directed toward another person and if that conduct either:

  1. Would cause a reasonable person to fear for the person’s safety or the safety of that person’s immediate family member and that person in fact fears for the person’s safety or the safety of that person’s immediate family member.
  2. Would cause a reasonable person to fear death of that person or that person’s immediate family member and that person in fact fears death of that person or that person’s immediate family member

 

Can I Get Arrested For Stalking?

  • Stalking is a crime in Arizona and subject to arrest under Arizona Revised Statues
  • Stalking may also relate to Arizona Domestic Violence Laws

When a police officer believes an act of domestic violence has occurred they are required by law to arrest the aggressor when an injury occurs, or when a weapon is used or threatened to be used.  They may make an arrest when any act of domestic violence occurs even when the other party does not want to prosecute.

 

Your Rights

Understanding Your Rights

Every victim of a crime is entitled to safety, healing, justice, and restitution. Arizona Christian University Department of Campus Safety Officers are not police officers. Our Department of Campus Safety works with local, county, state, and federal law enforcement officers and their victim’s rights units to ensure all employees and students receive the appropriate and accessible services available to crime victims.

Many of the rights provided to victims through legislation and rules of court are automatic.

If you are a victim, you also have the right upon request.

If there is any conflict of interest or disagreement between you and the prosecutor, you have the right to:

  1. Be directed to the appropriate legal assistance, and
  2. Be represented by your own attorney at your own expense.

 

University Disciplinary Actions

The personal safety & welfare of the campus community and its visitors is paramount to Arizona Christian University (ACU). ACU does not tolerate crime, violence, threats of violence, or acts of aggression towards members of the campus community or its visitors. ACU will investigate reported Clery Act crimes, other criminal acts, and student code of conduct violations. All student code of conduct violations and investigations will be coordinated through Student Life. Criminal investigations will be coordinated through ACU Department of Campus Safety, the Phoenix Police Department and Maricopa County Attorney’s Office.

ACU Student Handbook for discipline procedures.

The University may impose administrative sanctions following a final determination of an institutional disciplinary proceeding regarding Clery Act Crimes, other criminal acts, or administrative code of conduct violations include but are not limited to verbal/written warnings, educational consequences, behavioral contracts, community service, restitution, community service, fines, disciplinary probation, loss of privileges, deferred suspension, suspension, interim suspension, to expulsion.

 

Office of Campus Safety

Arizona Christian University
1 W. Firestorm Way
Glendale, AZ 85306

 Phone
Emergency:
9-1-1
Non-Emergency:
602-366-5268
Anonymous Tips:
602-489-5300 x810

  Email
[email protected]
arizonachristian.edu

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